Why has Russia been kicked out of the Olympics?

Ross Greenwood speaks to Former ASADA boss, Richard Ings, about the IOC’s banning Russia from the Winter Olympics over what it calls a “systematic manipulation of the anti-doping rules”.

Introduction: Why has Russia been kicked out of the Olympics?

Ross Greenwood:  Welcome back to running news run around the country. This is a big thing for sport there’s no doubt. That is Russia, the actual country itself has been thrown out of the Winter Olympics. This is after systemic state sanctioned doping at the Socky Windy Olympic Games which of course Russia hosted, which Russia wanted to be at the top of the middle tally. As a result, a situation, the former Swiss President Samuel Schmid is basically being given the job of looking into alleged Russian doping.

Russia got 13 gold medals at those Olympics out of 33 overall. Basically, the conclusion has now being suggested that the– you’ve got a situation where there has been unprecedented systemic manipulation, that’s what’s being now said. Let’s go to a man who understands this better the most that is Richard Ings who is the former chief executive, the boss of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority ASSATA who’s online. Many thanks for your time Richard.

Interview with: Richard Ings, Former CEO, ASADA

Richard Ings: Thanks for the invite Ross.

Ross Greenwood:  Is there any surprise of any of these really?

Richard Ings: No. This has been a story that’s been out there for quite some time. A couple of years in fact. The McLaren Commission has this comprehensively and found that there was a systematic state cheating. The I.O.C. has vindicated report by Richard McLaren and caused a very significant consequence on the Russian Olympic Committee.

Ross Greenwood:  The other aspect of this is the current Russian deputy prime minister Vitaly Mutko has had a life timely big ban placed on him because it suggested that he is the one who has organized the systemic doping at the Olympic Games and yet he is also the man responsible for running next year’s World Cup of football in Russia. There seems to be at least if not some conflicts of interest, certainly some real problems over the thought for Russia.

Richard Ings: Look just to correct the I.O.C. report didn’t find that he was actively involved in the state based dopping but it did find that he was the person accountable to making sure that the rules and regulations were enforceable filled down there. But you’re absolutely right Ross. He was involved at that highest level of letting this happen. He’s the deputy prime minister of Russia. He’s the head of the organizing committee for the forthcoming World Cup which is an incredible sequence of events.

Ross Greenwood:  From that point of view, do you believe it is reasonable for the Olympic committee to basically allow the Russian athletes to compete so long as they compete under the Olympic flag as distinct from competing under the Russian flag?

Richard Ings: Well about this decision Ross is that the enablers of this particular state anti-doping have been booted, Mutko and all the other leaders in Russia are expelled from future Olympic games. But the athletes have been given an olive branch if they can show that they’ve been subject to comprehensive testing that their names did not appear in any of the of the state-sanctioned doping, they have an opportunity to compete as independent athletes at the Olympic games.

Ross Greenwood:  Is that unusual, is that unprecedent? Is that happened before?

Richard Ings: This whole sequence of events is unprecedented. We’ve never had the host nation of an Olympic Games be involved in systematically wording games against every other nation and competitor at the event. The whole thing is unprecedented but I think we have to look at the individual rights of athletes. If they’re not on the list of those involved in doping, if they have been comprehensively tested, it would be denial of justice to exclude them from the Olympic games.

Ross Greenwood:  It going to be fascinating to watch exactly what does take place there South Korea, of course, will be the host of the 2018 Winter Olympics and those Russian athletes who do compete will be competing not under their own Russian flag but in fact the Olympic flag. Richard Ings the former boss of ASSATA here in Australia as always Richard we appreciate your time.

Richard Ings: Thanks, Ross.

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